Travel writing is not for everyone

Recently, I boarded a tour bus and took a trip to Iowa for a two-day Mississippi River cruise. The river part was wonderful; the long ride on the bus not so great; but I did meet a lot of nice people.

Invariably, while getting to know people, I mention that I was a travel writer. There is always the question: “How can I get a job like that?” Followed by, “Isn’t it great to be able to travel and get paid for it?”

Yes, it is, because a travel writer can get to see some wonderful places, but it’s not for everyone. What some people don’t understand is that when you travel as part of a job, you are constantly looking for particular facets of the trip – those that relate directly to the publication that has hired you. It’s not strictly pleasure as you are always on the clock.

When I was actively working, I looked at a trip from a tour operator’s point of view. How would a certain trip work for a group of 30 to 40 people? In most cases, the tour group is made up of senior citizens. Then the question becomes more specific. Is this a trip that 30 to 40 mature (retired, elderly, seniors, whatever) travelers would enjoy and can easily navigate?

A working writer also has to look for good photo opportunities. I took a lot of my own photos, but local tourism departments are always happy to provide more. Photos were also valuable to help me recall exactly what I saw.

I had to be alert for good quotes from fellow travelers and locals, and when I heard one I needed to ask that person for permission to include their name in the article with the quote.

I tried to meet local people, soak up the culture and the atmosphere of a place, and research facts later. I couldn’t just casually mention that I walked through the Musee d’Orsay in Paris and saw paintings of the masters: who were they; what paintings? Or that it occupied what was once a railway station built between 1898 and 1900. Details are necessary to give readers a true picture of a place.

All this is leading up to a conversation I had with a woman on my Mississippi River trip. She had lots of questions about travel writing. She seemed serious about wanting to try it, so I suggested she write about the trip we were on, send the manuscript to me, and I’d look it over and offer suggestions.

She did. Apparently, she hadn’t heard a word I said about the process. The piece was one page, single spaced, and void of any useful information. She wrote about the wonderful time she had and all the wonderful food. She did mention two of the cities where we stayed overnight, but nothing more. “What an adventure,” was one line. Why was it an adventure? There was no description of the boat, the river, the sights we saw, those we traveled with, nothing.

I wrote back to her stressing that she needed to include details about the trip, including quotes from other people, maybe some river lore that we heard on the trip, and a side bar about the riverboat company.

Her response was that she didn’t have the patience for all that, and she wouldn’t be trying travel writing after all.

Travel editors everywhere should thank me.

* * * * *

A Spirit in the Heart
By Ell Wheeler

Peri hesitated near the rear of the cabin. Far above her head, the stately Norway pines pierced the sky and blocked out the sun. Only the tiniest rays filtered through the canopy and dappled the ground with spots of light.

The trees swayed and made soft whispering sounds as they talked to the wind. The repetitive and mournful call of a loon echoed across the stillness of the lake and faded away. Then the wind stopped for an instant and nothing moved. All was quiet, and the only sound she could hear was the pounding of her heart.

“I don’t think I like this,” she said aloud, and her voice sounded strange and misplaced in the quiet of the woods. More softly, “I know I don’t like this.”
She hurried down a slight incline toward the front of the cabin, stepped through the screen door and reached for the lock, but found none. None on the inner wooden door, either.

“Great,” she muttered, but it wasn’t great at all. She felt exposed and vulnerable, and even a little frightened. It was a feeling strange to her, and she didn’t like it, not one bit.

***

A SPIRIT IN THE HEART: available on Amazon.com.

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Author: writersconsortium

I've been a freelance writer for 40 years; published several hundred magazine articles in subjects from biotechnology to travel, inspirational to nutsy, and even written a couple of novels. I also taught a number of classes on "marketing your writing" at a local university, with several of my students moving on to successful writing careers a lot quicker than I did, and I was thrilled to have been a part of their journey. I always enjoy passing on to new writers what I have learned over the years, and I hope this blog will continue to do that.. The writing assignments I most enjoyed were for travel industry publications. I wrote for the National Tour Association, The Group Travel Leader and Bank Travel Management, which is now called The Elite Traveler. Now I concentrate on fiction and essays. I published one romance novel, Caribbean Charade, under the pen name of Louise Perry, but I have since republished it as Ell Wheeler. Caribbean Charade and my latest novel, A Spirit in the Heart, are both available in ebook and paperback on Amazon.com.

One thought on “Travel writing is not for everyone”

  1. Love it. Did your eyes roll when you got her manuscript? I hope Kathy Brown sees this. Travel writing is fun, but not a joy ride, for sure!

    When YOU write about this trip, I’d like to read your story about it.

    Hope you are doing well.

    Vickie

    >

    Like

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