Editing your work

I really do like to write. Sometimes, however, there are times when I write too much. I’m so anxious to put down every word that comes into my head that I don’t immediately realize I have included words that don’t really have to be there.

Take a look at that last sentence: “that don’t really have to be there.” The word “really” is unnecessary, but it just felt natural. I did it again. “…it just felt natural.” The word “just” is a throwaway.

One of my favorite words that gets inserted into my text is “actually.” Such as, “Actually, he did like to eat ice cream.” Totally not necessary, but I do it all the time.

I didn’t realize this quirk of mine until recently when I was proof reading one of my manuscripts. If you use Word’s review of a document to check spelling and grammar, it will tag certain phrases and suggest replacing them with one or two words. Remember, they are suggestions, but don’t use four words if one will do the job effectively.

Self-editing can be difficult. I know we have all gotten inspired and motivated to sit at the computer with flying fingers. That’s great, but typing the last period on a document, does not finish it.

I learned a great lesson on editing from a sale that I made to Woman’s Day magazine years ago. It was a short essay about learning to have fun with your children and to go down to their level now and then. The editors liked the idea, but the writing left much to be desired. In my defense, I was a fledgling writer, self-taught, and still learning.

Example of what I wrote: My two young daughters and my niece stood with me in the kitchen and watched the pounding rain. The three girls were obviously distressed.
Woman’s Day: They eliminated the last sentence. Wasn’t needed.
I wrote: So many times, I have believed….
Woman’s Day: Often I have believed.
I wrote: …they had never before had reason to come together in a group for the sake of play.
Woman’s Day: …they had never played in such a group.

It was embarrassing to see how much a good editor could do and maintain what I wanted to say. I was shocked to see that the final edit reduced the article by at least one-third. I used this essay when I taught classes in marketing freelance writing as an example of how we can get carried away with words, and why we don’t always need so many.

When I sold this piece, to say it was exciting is an understatement. I was thrilled to have a byline in a national publication, and the pay wasn’t bad either.

I’d like to add that a writer shouldn’t feel that she must always take the advice of an editor and change a specific word or phrase. Do keep an open mind and listen to the professionals, but if your words express what you want to say in exactly the way you want to say it, protect them. We each have a style of writing, a voice, that is our own. Never abandon that to fit into a mold of someone else’s making.

Happy writing. Happy editing. I wish you success.

And if you find too many unnecessary words in this post, I don’t want to know about it.

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